PPT-bottom
EatingHealthy_PowerpointFile-RGB.jpg
PPT-bottom
How To Use The Program
Takes you to the beginning
Takes you back one slide
Takes you to the next slide
Returns you back to the last slide viewed
PPT-bottom
Our goal is to help you understand hearthealthy eating and how to keep yourself ashealthy as possible.
If you have any questions please ask yourdoctor, dietitian or healthcare provider.
Please remember to turn your volume up onthe computer, since some slides have audioand video.
Welcome
PPT-bottom
Important Things To Know
Nutrition Recommendations
Shopping Tips
Cooking and Seasoning Tips
Sample Meal Plans
Eating Out Tips
Food and Drug Interactions
PPT-bottom
Nutrition Recommendations for LoweringHeart Disease Risk
Balance calorie intake and physical activity to achieve or maintain a healthybody weight.
Eat a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grain and high-fiber foods.
Consume fish two to three times per week.
Limit lean meat to 5 ounces and 1 ounce low fat cheese daily.
Limit your daily intake of saturated fat to 10 -15 grams and avoid trans-fats(partially hydrogenated oil).
PPT-bottom
Nutrition Recommendations
Use monounsaturated fats and omega 3 fatty acids in place of saturated fats.
Limit total added fats to 3-6 teaspoons per day.
Select fat-free, 1% fat and low-fat dairy products.
Limit foods and drinks with added sugar.
Use cooking methods that require little or no fat. Bake, broil, roast, steam, grill,sauté or microwave instead of frying.
Choose and prepare foods with herbs and spices instead of salt.
If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation.
PPT-bottom
What Is Cholesterol?
Cholesterol is a fat-like substancefound in all foods that come fromanimals. It is also made in the bodyby our liver.
Most people eat foods that containcholesterol, but it is important to avoidexcess amounts. Too muchcholesterol in the blood can lead tobuild-up in the arteries.
Eating foods high in saturated fat andtrans fat can also increase cholesterollevels.
PPT-bottom
Did You Know There Is GoodAnd Bad Cholesterol?
LDL (Low-density lipoprotein)
the BAD cholesterol, can buildup on the artery walls andcause a blockage.
HDL (High-density lipoprotein)the GOOD cholesterol, helpsremove bad cholesterol.
PPT-bottom
Top Ten Foods to Avoid to LowerCholesterol and Triglycerides
Regular Ice Cream
Bacon/Sausage/Fatback
Bologna/Salami
Regular Peanut Butter
      Deep fried foods
Butter/Stick Margarine
      Donuts/Pastries
Whole Milk/Cheese
Hot Dogs
Chicken Skin
PPT-bottom
What Are Triglycerides?
Fat is carried in the blood in the form of triglycerides. Triglyceridelevels in the blood may be raised by extra body weight.
In some people, eating too much fat, too much sugar or drinkingalcohol may raise triglyceride levels.
Limiting sugar, alcohol and fats can decrease triglycerides.
Losing extra weight, increasing exercise and eating fish can helplower triglycerides to a healthy range.
PPT-bottom
More Foods To Limit For HealthyTriglyceride Levels
Regular soda
Candy
Fruit juice
Regular Jell-O®
Alcohol
Honey
Sweet tea
Regular popsicles
Jelly
Syrup
PPT-bottom
Beware Of Trans Fat
Trans fats are created when hydrogen is forced into liquid oils to make themsolid at room temperature.
Trans fats raise LDL (bad cholesterol) and lower HDL (good cholesterol), sothey should be avoided.
Common sources include vegetable shortening, stick margarine, fried foods,baked goods, cookies, snack foods, regular peanut butters, and microwavepopcorn.
All packaged foods are required to list trans fat content on their Nutrition Factslabel.  Be careful!  Under FDA regulations, “if the serving contains less than 0.5grams of trans fat content, when declared, shall be expressed as zero.”
PPT-bottom
Trans Fat
If we ate three products, each containing .45 grams of trans fatper serving, we  have eaten 1.35 grams of trans fat, even thoughthe nutrition label stated each food had 0 grams of trans fat perserving.  There is no safe amount of trans fat.
Products claiming “zero trans fat per serving” may still have transfats.  To make sure a food does not contain trans fat, check theingredient list for the words “partially hydrogenated oil”.  If thesewords are listed, the food contains trans fats.
PPT-bottom
Which Is Better?Margarine Or Butter?
Stick margarine is loadedwith trans fats and butter isfull of saturated fats.
So what should youchoose?
Your best bet is to gowith a spreadable tubproduct with nopartially hydrogenatedoil!
C:\Documents and Settings\mce20\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\XQ77A1B0\Butter-Cubes-In-Bowl[1].jpg
PPT-bottom
Which Is Better?Margarine Or Butter?
The products listed beloware all good examples:
Country Crock®
Brummel and Brown®
I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter®
Land O Lakes Light Butterwith Canola Oil®
Promise®
Smart Balance®
Some spreads have addedheart health benefits fromplant sterols that can helplower cholesterol:
Smart Balance LightSpreadable Butter and CanolaOil®
Promise Activ®
Benecol Spread®
PPT-bottom
What Is Sodium?
Sodium is a mineral needed to maintain body fluids andnerve function.  We need sodium for our body to work, butmost of us consume more than we need.
The average sodium intake is currently 3440 mg per day.
Guidelines for healthy eating patterns recommend limitingsodium to less than 2300 mg per day or approximately 700mg per meal.
PPT-bottom
How Can Sodium IntakeBe Controlled?
To help improve your sodium intake start by not adding saltto foods during cooking and at the table.
Next, read food labels to see how much sodium a foodcontains.
Most of the sodium we eat comes from the way foods areprocessed, packaged, or canned.
PPT-bottom
Why Limit Sodium?
A build up of sodium in the bodycan cause increased bloodpressure, shortness of breath andwater retention.
Untreated high blood pressurecan weaken and scar yourarteries.
Decreasing sodium in the diet canreduce the risk of heart attack orstroke associated with high bloodpressure.
MP900400592[1]
PPT-bottom
What Does The American Heart AssociationRecommend For Healthy Blood Pressure?
PPT-bottom
Eating Less Sodium Can LowerSome People’s Blood Pressure
Adults with prehypertension andhypertension can benefit fromlimiting sodium to 1500 mg perday to help lower blood pressure.
Avoid meals with more than500 mg sodium per serving.
Pick single foods with 140 mgsodium or less per serving.
Do not add salt to foods duringcooking and at the table.
Common terms that you may see on foods:
Sodium free:  Less than 5 mg per serving
Very low sodium:  35 mg or less per serving
Low sodium:  140 mg or less per serving
Reduced sodium:  At least 25% less sodiumin each serving
Lightly salted:  50% less sodium than theoriginal product
PPT-bottom
Important Reminders AboutSalt And Sodium
Salt is used to preserve foods so fresh foods are lowest in sodium.
 
Not adding cheese, gravy, or sauces to foods can lower sodium.
Use only seasonings with no salt or sodium in the ingredient list.
Many plain frozen vegetables have little or no salt added. Frozenvegetables with sauces can be high in sodium so read the label before youbuy.
Salt substitutes are not healthy for everyone.  Some salt substitutes maystill have sodium. Most salt substitutes contain a lot of potassium.
Always check with your doctor before using salt substitutes.
PPT-bottom
Limit Foods High in Salt
MP900400592[1]
MP900175594[1]
MP900427640[1]
MP900432782[1]
MP900427860[1]
MP900400611[1]
MP900400593[1]
MP900432804[1]
MP900433013[1]
MP900442904[1]
MP900400602[1]
MP900409573[1]
PPT-bottom
High Sodium Foods to Avoid
PPT-bottom
Cooking Tips For Herbs & Spices
Start with ¼ of a teaspoon for fourservings and increase to suit yourtaste.
If you are using fresh herbs, useone-third of the amount called forin the recipe.
Add herbs and spices near theend of cooking time to retain theflavor.
Salt free seasonings like Mrs.Dash® are also good flavor extras.
E:\Cardiac Rehab Online Education Project\spice spoons.jpg
PPT-bottom
Low Sodium Seasoning Suggestions
Apple
Cook with pork
Bay leaf
Add to fish, chicken & meat dishes
Chives, onion
Chop & add to potatoes or salad
Curry powder
Use in meat, chicken, vegetable & rice
Cloves
Use with boiled onions to flavor white sauces
 Garlic cloves
Crush & use in any meat dish or salad, add to margarine for garlic bread
 
Herb vinegars
Put some sprigs of herbs (e.g. mixed rosemary, tarragon or thyme) into asmall jar with wine vinegar.  Use on its own or mixed with oil to eat with anysavory dish or tossed into hot vegetables
Lemon juice
Add to fish, chicken dishes or vegetables
Mixed herbs
Use to add flavor to stuffing & omelets
Nutmeg
Sprinkle over vegetables (cabbage, cauliflower, potatoes)
Parsley
Add to sauces or fish dishes
Paprika
Use as a garnish in chicken & rice dishes
Pepper
Add to savory dishes
Rosemary
Use to season lamb, veal or cabbage
Sage
Cook in stews or stuffing with pork
Tarragon
Sprinkle in scrambled eggs, chicken and fish
Vinegar
Add to potatoes, hard boiled eggs, greens
PPT-bottom
Spice Blend Recipes
Makes about 1/3 cup each.Use to season a variety ofdishes, including meat,chicken, fish, rice, potatoes,or vegetables.
Click the link to view the recipe.
After viewing select the back arrow to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
What Is Fiber?
Fiber is a part of plant foods, which the body cannot digest or absorb.
There are two types of fiber:  soluble and insoluble.
Soluble fiber: found in oats, rye, barley, fruit and beans, has been shown tohelp lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease.  Including 10 -15grams of soluble fiber per day can help lower LDL “bad” cholesterol.
Insoluble fiber: found in whole wheat, bran, nuts and vegetables, is animportant factor in keeping your digestive system healthy and strong.  A highfiber diet may prevent constipation and diverticulosis.  While this type of fiberhas not been found to lower cholesterol, it is useful in weight control because itcreates a feeling of fullness.
PPT-bottom
Easy Ways To Increase Fiber
Substitute high fiber foods (100% whole grain bread, crackers, and cereals,brown rice, fruits and vegetables) for low fiber foods (white bread, crackers,and cereals, white rice, candy and chips.)
Purchase products made with 100% whole grain.  Be sure the first ingredientlisted on the food label is a whole grain or whole wheat.
Try to eat more vegetables and fresh fruit, including the skins whenappropriate.  Peeling fruits and vegetables can reduce their fiber, and skins area good source of fiber.
Be sure to adjust your fiber intake gradually to give your body time to adjustand drink plenty of fluids to assist in digestion.
PPT-bottom
Read Food Labels
A label that has more than 3 grams offiber listed per serving and 10% or moreof the daily value is a good source of fiber.
A label that has more than 5 grams offiber listed per serving and 20% or moreof the daily value is an excellent source offiber.
Click the link to view the information.
 A separate window will open. After viewing close window to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
Guidelines For Healthy Food Choices
Click here to view andprint the Guidelines forHealthy Food Choicesinstruction sheet
C:\Users\atkica\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\EPUKS3T9\healthy-grocery-shopping1[1].png
A separate window will open. After viewing close window to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
At The Grocery Store –Include On Your List:
Whole grain breads, cereals, pasta,brown rice
Dry beans and peas
Soy protein products and tofu
Skim or 1% milk
Eggs, egg substitutes or egg whites
Low fat cheeses, yogurt and frozenyogurt
Fresh fruits and vegetables
Fruits canned in their own juice or “light”
White or sweet potatoes
Fish (salmon, shellfish and all whitefish)
Skinless poultry
Lean cuts of beef such as, tenderloin, top orbottom round, eye of the round and sirloin
Lean cuts of pork such as, pork loin orcenter-cut pork chops
Olive, canola or peanut oil
Tub margarine, squeeze or spray
Natural peanut butter, unsalted walnuts,almonds, peanuts, pistachios, pecans
Reduced-fat crackers, pretzels, rice cakes.Look for low-salt choices
Low-fat cookies, including fig bars, vanillawafers, graham crackers and gingersnaps
Low-fat desserts such as angel food cake,gelatin, pudding with non-fat or 1% milk
PPT-bottom
Special Considerations ForDiabetic Patients
In addition to the Heart Healthy Guidelines, there are Diabetes Meal Plan guidelines thatwill help you maintain good control of your blood sugars:
Eat meals and snacks around the same time each day.  Try not to go longer than 5 hours withouteating and Do Not Skip Meals!
Eat balanced meals to help keep your blood sugar at a steady level.
Eat about the same amount of Carbohydrate (CHO) foods at each meal.
Carbohydrate foods include foods from the following food groups:
Breads, cereals, pastas, and rice
Starchy vegetables such as corn, peas, potatoes, winter squash, dried beans and peas
Fruit and fruit juices (remember to choose canned fruit in natural juice and fruit juices with nosugar added)
Milk and yogurt
Limit intake of high sugar foods and beverages.  Choose unsweetened beverages and diet sodasinstead of sweetened beverages.
PPT-bottom
Some Suggestions ForSnacking Are:
Unsalted popcorn or nuts
Crackers with unsalted tops withlow-sugar jelly and/or naturalpeanut butter
Fruit with reduced fat cheese
Fresh vegetables and low sodium,low fat dip
E:\Cardiac Rehab Online Education Project\fruit and cheese tray.jpg
PPT-bottom
Target Blood Sugars
Fasting
80-130
2 hours after a meal
Less than 180
A1C
Less than 7%
PPT-bottom
The Plate Method
Click here to view the plate method
E:\Cardiac Rehab Online Education Project\dinner plate.jpg
Click the link to view the information.
 A separate window will open. After viewing close window to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
Sample 1-Day Menu
(2,000 calories)
Click here for 2,000 caloriemenu sample
(1,500 calories)
Click here for 1,500 caloriemenu sample
Click the link to view the information.
 A separate window will open. After viewing close window to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
How To Choose AndPrepare Meat
Choose lean cuts of meat, skinless chicken or turkey and trim fat.
Even lean meat has fat in it, so use a rack to drain off the fat whenbroiling, roasting or baking.  Try to avoid fried foods.  Baste withwine, fruit juices or a low-fat marinade instead of meat drippings.
Fish, poultry and veal are lower in saturated fat than beef, lamb orpork, so choose them more often.
Limit “luncheon” and “variety” meats like sausage and salami.
Cook stews, boiled meat and soup a day ahead, then refrigerate sothat fat can be skimmed from the top before reheating.
Dry beans, peas, nuts and seeds are heart healthy alternativeprotein sources.
PPT-bottom
Red Meat
Limit to 2-3 times per week or less.
Choose lean cuts of beef and pork.  Lookfor the words “round” or “loin.”
USDA “select” beef contains the least fat.The second leanest grade is “choice.”
Choose meats that are at least 90% lean.
Make sure to trim away visible fat beforecooking.
C:\Documents and Settings\mce20\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\X1BIYDS7\hqdefault[1].jpg
PPT-bottom
Poultry
Remove the skin from poultrybefore cooking if able.
Choose white meat.  Darkmeat is higher in fat.
Chicken and turkey often costless than other meats, andthey have less fat and fewercalories.
PPT-bottom
Fish
The American Heart Associationencourages eating fish at leasttwice per week.
Fatty fish contain Omega-3fatty acids.  This includessalmon, mackerel, albacoretuna, and lake trout.  Omega-3fatty acids protect againstheart disease by loweringblood triglycerides (fats) andreducing inflammation.
Fish is healthier because it islow in saturated fat.
PPT-bottom
Modifying A Recipe
There are many changes you can make to your favoriterecipes to make them healthier.
Many ingredients that are high in fat, sugar or salt can bereduced or eliminated.
You can also substitute low-fat, low sugar or low saltingredients.
PPT-bottom
To Decrease Fat in Recipes:
Instead of….
Try….
1 cup butter, shortening or lard
2/3 cup oil or 1 cup regular tub margarine (68% oilfor baking; “light” margarine has too much water)
Whole milk or 2% milk
1% or skim milk
1 cup sour cream
1 cup non-fat sour cream or non-fat plain yogurt or1 cup low-fat cottage cheese blended with 2 tbsp.lemon juice
Condensed cream soup
Low-fat or fat-free condensed cream soup
Cream cheese
Light or fat-free cream cheese
Cream, evaporated milk, or half and half
Canned evaporated skim milk
Baking chocolate (1 square)
3 Tbsp. cocoa  plus
1 Tbsp. Tub margarine or 1 tsp. oil
PPT-bottom
To Decrease Sodium in Recipes
Instead of…
Try…
Onion, celery or garlic salt
Onion, celery, garlic powder
Bouillon
Low sodium bouillon
Meat tenderizers
½ egg white per pound of meat
Soy sauce or steak sauce
Low-sodium soy sauce or steak sauce
PPT-bottom
To Decrease Sugar in Recipes:
Instead of…
Try…
Canned fruit in heavy syrup
Juice or water-packed canned fruit
Regular pudding
Sugar-free pudding
Regular gelatin
Sugar-free gelatin
1 cup sugar
1 cup Splenda® or ½ cupSplenda/sugar blend
Pancake syrup
Sugar-free pancake syrup
1/3 of sugar in baked recipes
Add cinnamon or vanilla
PPT-bottom
Tips to Make Low-Fat Low-SaltFoods Tasty
Use onion to season green beans.
Use vinegar in your cooking water for greens.
Try some of the flavored vinegars.
Use curry
1) Rub outside of chicken with curry before baking.
2) Add to chicken salad.
Add rosemary to water when boiling chicken.
Use sweet potatoes in vegetable soup and beef stew.Sweet potatoes add flavor to broth.
Make fat-free, low-sodium, tasty broth as follows:
Put all leftover bones (beef, chicken, turkey,pork) in a bag in the freezer.  When you havea bag full, put in crock-pot or a large pot,cover with water; add diced onion, celery,carrots, garlic and any other spice you like.Let simmer all day.  You may need to addwater.  Strain bones and vegetables fromliquid.  Put liquid in the refrigerator for fat toharden.  The next day, remove fat.  Pourliquid onto into ice cube trays to make brothcubes.  Use broth cubes for seasoningveggies, whipped potatoes, or soups.
PPT-bottom
Chicken Salad Dressing Recipe
Mix ½ portion of low-fat mayonnaise with ½ portion of low-fat plain yogurt.  Add a squirt of lemon juice and ½ to
1 teaspoon of curry.  Mix well.
Diced apples, pears, grapes or pineapple chunks add a lotof flavor to chicken, turkey or tuna salad.
PPT-bottom
Chicken/Rice Casserole Recipe
Orange Juice
Chicken Breasts
Instant Rice, Uncooked
Broth Cubes from previous recipe, melted
Mix enough orange juice and melted broth cubes with rice to make asoupy type mixture.  Pour into a casserole dish.  Lay chicken breast ontop.  Pour a little orange juice over chicken.  Cover and bake at 350°until chicken is done.  Check rice during cooking – you may need toadd more liquid.
PPT-bottom
Oven Fried Chicken Recipe
Coat chicken with plain low fat yogurt or meltedsoft tub margarine.  Roll in potato flakes.  Bake at350°for 45 minutes.  Add seasonings to yogurt ormargarine for extra flavor.
PPT-bottom
Oven Fried Potatoes Recipe
Cut a potato into wedges. Lightly brush withmelted margarine or olive oil. Sprinkle withMrs. Dash®.  Bake at 400°for 45-60minutes.
PPT-bottom
Healthy Eating On The Run
Order items without cheese.
Ask to have no salt added to your food.
Choose restaurants that offer low-fat menu items.
Order all dressings and sauces on the side so you can control yourportions.
Don’t be shy.  Ask the server about ingredients or preparation methodsfor the dishes you’re not familiar with.  You deserve to know whatyou’re eating.
PPT-bottom
Healthy Eating On The Run
Try to limit foods that are prepared with fat:  Avoid fried, crispy, au gratin,creamed, buttery, scalloped, and items in cheese, butter or hollandaise sauce.
Look for words that show the food is prepared with little or no fat:  steamed,roasted, baked, broiled, poached, dry broiled, simmered, au jus (in its own juice).
Ask for substitutions such as a baked potato, vegetables, or a salad instead offrench fries.
Split large portions or take part of it home.  Ask for take-home containers at thebeginning of the meal – out of sight, out of mind.  If you order a high-fat desserton occasion, keep the portion smaller by sharing.
PPT-bottom
Healthy Eating On The Run
Try not to get too hungry.  You may over eat or be more likely to make poor food choices.
If you are going to eat late, have a healthy snack such as an apple or a few crackersbefore you leave home.  Drink a large glass of water while you’re waiting for your meal,because thirst is sometimes misinterpreted as hunger.
Salads in restaurants may or may not be healthy, depending on what you select.  Whenyou order or go to the salad bar leave off high-fat, high-salt items such as grated cheese,cream dressings, bacon, olives, pickles, and croutons.
Try to limit foods that are prepared with salt:  pickled, smoked, in broth or brine.
Use mustard instead of mayonnaise.
Ask the restaurant if nutrition information is available.
PPT-bottom
Guide to Dining Out
Click here for guide to dining out handout
E:\Cardiac Rehab Online Education Project\group dining out.jpg
Click the link to view.
A separate window will open. After viewing close window to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
Warfarin (Coumadin®) andVitamin K Foods
If you take Warfarin, please consider the following.
Warfarin (Coumadin) is a blood thinner that helps prevent clots from forming in your blood vessels.
To help Warfarin work properly, it is important to keep your Vitamin K intake
as consistent as possible.
For example, if you usually eat 3 servings of high Vitamin K foods a week, try to eat 3 servings of high Vitamin Kfoods every week.
Sudden increases in Vitamin K can decrease the effect of Warfarin. Also, greatly lowering intake ofVitamin K could increase the effect of Warfarin.
It is recommended that Warfarin be taken at the same time each day.
Always get follow up lab work done.
PPT-bottom
Grapefruit Juice and Cranberry ProductsDrug Interaction
Grapefruit juice and cranberry productscontain a substance that has the ability toincrease or decrease the absorption of avariety of drugs.
Avoid grapefruit juice when taking thegeneric drugs linked below.
Click here for information on GrapefruitJuice and Cranberry Products DrugInteraction.
Click here for information on Warfarin(Coumadin®) and Vitamin K Foods.
C:\Documents and Settings\mce20\Local Settings\Temporary Internet Files\Content.IE5\IH7BKQPV\MP900448701[1].jpg
Please check with your doctor orpharmacist if you have any questionsabout the drugs you are taking.
Click the link to view.
A separate window will open. After viewing close window to return to this page.
PPT-bottom
For More Information On HealthAnd Food Intake:
American Heart Association
http://www.heart.org
American Diabetes Association
http://www.diabetes.org/
dLife: The Diabetes Health Company
dlife.com
2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
www.cnpp.usda.gov/2015-2020-dietary-guidelines-americans
PPT-bottom
Thank You !
PPT-bottom
PPT-bottom
E:\Cardiac Rehab Online Education Project\recipe card.jpg
Savory Blend
1 Tbsp. Onion Powder
1 tsp.  Garlic Powder
1 tsp. Basil
1 Tbsp. Paprika
1 Tbsp. Parsley
PPT-bottom
E:\Cardiac Rehab Online Education Project\recipe card.jpg
Herbal Blend
2 tsp. Thyme
2 tsp. Sage
2 tsp. Rosemary
2 tsp. Marjoram
1 tsp. Pepper