FirstHealth of the Carolinas

Heart Attack Quality Measures

A heart attack (also called an AMI or acute myocardial infarction) happens when the arteries leading to the heart become blocked and the blood supply is slowed or stopped. These quality measures show the standards of care for this condition.

The rates displayed in these graphs are from data reported for discharges January 1, 2013 through March 31, 2013. The top hospitals rate represents the top 10 percent of hospitals nationwide. The higher the score the better. Click here to view the legend for the graphs.

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Percentage of Patients given ACEI or ARB for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction

Explanation:
ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors and ARBs (angiotension receptor blockers) are medicines that are used to treat heart attacks, heart failure or a decreased function of the heart.


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Percentage of Patients given Aspirin on Arrival

Explanation:
Aspirin can help keep blood clots from forming and dissolve blood clots that can cause heart attacks.


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Percentage of Patients given Aspirin on Discharge

Explanation:
Taking aspirin may help prevent further heart attacks.


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Percentage of Patients given Beta-blockers at Discharge

Explanation:
Beta-blockers are a type of medicine that is used to lower blood pressure, treat chest pain and heart failure, and to help prevent a heart attack.


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Percentage of Patients given Percutaneous Coronary Intervention within 120 Minutes of Arrival

Explanation:
The procedure called Percutaneous Coronary Interventions (PCI) is among the most effective for opening the blocked vessels that cause heart attacks. Doctors may perform PCI, or give medicine to open the blocked vessel. In some cases, they do both.


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AMI Optimal Care Score

Explanation:
This represents the percentage of patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction who received all of the quality measures.


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